Recipes

The following recipes demonstrate some of the capabilities of the gpiozero library. Please note that all recipes are written assuming Python 3. Recipes may work under Python 2, but no guarantees!

Pin Numbering

This library uses Broadcom (BCM) pin numbering for the GPIO pins, as opposed to physical (BOARD) numbering. Unlike in the RPi.GPIO library, this is not configurable.

Any pin marked “GPIO” in the diagram below can be used as a pin number. For example, if an LED was attached to “GPIO17” you would specify the pin number as 17 rather than 11:

_images/pin_layout.svg

LED

_images/led.png

Turn an LED on and off repeatedly:

from gpiozero import LED
from time import sleep

red = LED(17)

while True:
    red.on()
    sleep(1)
    red.off()
    sleep(1)

Alternatively:

from gpiozero import LED
from signal import pause

red = LED(17)

red.blink()

pause()

Note

Reaching the end of a Python script will terminate the process and GPIOs may be reset. Keep your script alive with signal.pause(). See Keep your script running for more information.

LED with variable brightness

Any regular LED can have its brightness value set using PWM (pulse-width-modulation). In GPIO Zero, this can be achieved using PWMLED using values between 0 and 1:

from gpiozero import PWMLED
from time import sleep

led = PWMLED(17)

while True:
    led.value = 0  # off
    sleep(1)
    led.value = 0.5  # half brightness
    sleep(1)
    led.value = 1  # full brightness
    sleep(1)

Similarly to blinking on and off continuously, a PWMLED can pulse (fade in and out continuously):

from gpiozero import PWMLED
from signal import pause

led = PWMLED(17)

led.pulse()

pause()

Button

_images/button.png

Check if a Button is pressed:

from gpiozero import Button

button = Button(2)

while True:
    if button.is_pressed:
        print("Button is pressed")
    else:
        print("Button is not pressed")

Wait for a button to be pressed before continuing:

from gpiozero import Button

button = Button(2)

button.wait_for_press()
print("Button was pressed")

Run a function every time the button is pressed:

from gpiozero import Button
from signal import pause

def say_hello():
    print("Hello!")

button = Button(2)

button.when_pressed = say_hello

pause()

Note

Note that the line button.when_pressed = say_hello does not run the function say_hello, rather it creates a reference to the function to be called when the button is pressed. Accidental use of button.when_pressed = say_hello() would set the when_pressed action to None (the return value of this function) which would mean nothing happens when the button is pressed.

Similarly, functions can be attached to button releases:

from gpiozero import Button
from signal import pause

def say_hello():
    print("Hello!")

def say_goodbye():
    print("Goodbye!")

button = Button(2)

button.when_pressed = say_hello
button.when_released = say_goodbye

pause()

Button controlled LED

_images/led_button_bb.svg

Turn on an LED when a Button is pressed:

from gpiozero import LED, Button
from signal import pause

led = LED(17)
button = Button(2)

button.when_pressed = led.on
button.when_released = led.off

pause()

Alternatively:

from gpiozero import LED, Button
from signal import pause

led = LED(17)
button = Button(2)

led.source = button.values

pause()

Button controlled camera

Using the button press to trigger PiCamera to take a picture using button.when_pressed = camera.capture would not work because the capture() method requires an output parameter. However, this can be achieved using a custom function which requires no parameters:

from gpiozero import Button
from picamera import PiCamera
from datetime import datetime
from signal import pause

button = Button(2)
camera = PiCamera()

def capture():
    datetime = datetime.now().isoformat()
    camera.capture('/home/pi/%s.jpg' % datetime)

button.when_pressed = capture

pause()

Another example could use one button to start and stop the camera preview, and another to capture:

from gpiozero import Button
from picamera import PiCamera
from datetime import datetime
from signal import pause

left_button = Button(2)
right_button = Button(3)
camera = PiCamera()

def capture():
    datetime = datetime.now().isoformat()
    camera.capture('/home/pi/%s.jpg' % datetime)

left_button.when_pressed = camera.start_preview
left_button.when_released = camera.stop_preview
right_button.when_pressed = capture

pause()

Shutdown button

The Button class also provides the ability to run a function when the button has been held for a given length of time. This example will shut down the Raspberry Pi when the button is held for 2 seconds:

from gpiozero import Button
from subprocess import check_call
from signal import pause

def shutdown():
    check_call(['sudo', 'poweroff'])

shutdown_btn = Button(17, hold_time=2)
shutdown_btn.when_held = shutdown

pause()

LEDBoard

A collection of LEDs can be accessed using LEDBoard:

from gpiozero import LEDBoard
from time import sleep
from signal import pause

leds = LEDBoard(5, 6, 13, 19, 26)

leds.on()
sleep(1)
leds.off()
sleep(1)
leds.value = (1, 0, 1, 0, 1)
sleep(1)
leds.blink()

pause()

Using LEDBoard with pwm=True allows each LED’s brightness to be controlled:

from gpiozero import LEDBoard

leds = LEDBoard(5, 6, 13, 19, 26, pwm=True)

leds.value = (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0)

LEDBarGraph

A collection of LEDs can be treated like a bar graph using LEDBarGraph:

from gpiozero import LEDBarGraph
from time import sleep

graph = LEDBarGraph(5, 6, 13, 19, 26, pwm=True)

graph.value = 1/10  # (0.5, 0, 0, 0, 0)
sleep(1)
graph.value = 3/10  # (1, 0.5, 0, 0, 0)
sleep(1)
graph.value = -3/10  # (0, 0, 0, 0.5, 1)
sleep(1)
graph.value = 9/10  # (1, 1, 1, 1, 0.5)
sleep(1)
graph.value = 95/100  # (1, 1, 1, 1, 0.75)
sleep(1)

Note values are essentially rounded to account for the fact LEDs can only be on or off when pwm=False (the default).

However, using LEDBarGraph with pwm=True allows more precise values using LED brightness:

from gpiozero import LEDBarGraph
from time import sleep

graph = LEDBarGraph(5, 6, 13, 19, 26, pwm=True)

graph.value = 1/10  # (0.5, 0, 0, 0, 0)
sleep(1)
graph.value = 3/10  # (1, 0.5, 0, 0, 0)
sleep(1)
graph.value = -3/10  # (0, 0, 0, 0.5, 1)
sleep(1)
graph.value = 9/10  # (1, 1, 1, 1, 0.5)
sleep(1)
graph.value = 95/100  # (1, 1, 1, 1, 0.75)
sleep(1)

Traffic Lights

_images/traffic_lights_bb.svg

A full traffic lights system.

Using a TrafficLights kit like Pi-Stop:

from gpiozero import TrafficLights
from time import sleep

lights = TrafficLights(2, 3, 4)

lights.green.on()

while True:
    sleep(10)
    lights.green.off()
    lights.amber.on()
    sleep(1)
    lights.amber.off()
    lights.red.on()
    sleep(10)
    lights.amber.on()
    sleep(1)
    lights.green.on()
    lights.amber.off()
    lights.red.off()

Alternatively:

from gpiozero import TrafficLights
from time import sleep
from signal import pause

lights = TrafficLights(2, 3, 4)

def traffic_light_sequence():
    while True:
        yield (0, 0, 1) # green
        sleep(10)
        yield (0, 1, 0) # amber
        sleep(1)
        yield (1, 0, 0) # red
        sleep(10)
        yield (1, 1, 0) # red+amber
        sleep(1)

lights.source = traffic_light_sequence()

pause()

Using LED components:

from gpiozero import LED
from time import sleep

red = LED(2)
amber = LED(3)
green = LED(4)

green.on()
amber.off()
red.off()

while True:
    sleep(10)
    green.off()
    amber.on()
    sleep(1)
    amber.off()
    red.on()
    sleep(10)
    amber.on()
    sleep(1)
    green.on()
    amber.off()
    red.off()

Travis build LED indicator

Use LEDs to indicate the status of a Travis build. A green light means the tests are passing, a red light means the build is broken:

from travispy import TravisPy
from gpiozero import LED
from gpiozero.tools import negated
from time import sleep
from signal import pause

def build_passed(repo='RPi-Distro/python-gpiozero', delay=3600):
    t = TravisPy()
    r = t.repo(repo)
    while True:
        yield r.last_build_state == 'passed'
        sleep(delay) # Sleep an hour before hitting travis again

red = LED(12)
green = LED(16)

red.source = negated(green.values)
green.source = build_passed()
pause()

Note this recipe requires travispy. Install with sudo pip3 install travispy.

Push button stop motion

Capture a picture with the camera module every time a button is pressed:

from gpiozero import Button
from picamera import PiCamera

button = Button(2)
camera = PiCamera()

camera.start_preview()
frame = 1
while True:
    button.wait_for_press()
    camera.capture('/home/pi/frame%03d.jpg' % frame)
    frame += 1

See Push Button Stop Motion for a full resource.

Reaction Game

_images/reaction_game_bb.svg

When you see the light come on, the first person to press their button wins!

from gpiozero import Button, LED
from time import sleep
import random

led = LED(17)

player_1 = Button(2)
player_2 = Button(3)

time = random.uniform(5, 10)
sleep(time)
led.on()

while True:
    if player_1.is_pressed:
        print("Player 1 wins!")
        break
    if player_2.is_pressed:
        print("Player 2 wins!")
        break

led.off()

See Quick Reaction Game for a full resource.

GPIO Music Box

Each button plays a different sound!

from gpiozero import Button
import pygame.mixer
from pygame.mixer import Sound
from signal import pause

pygame.mixer.init()

button_sounds = {
    Button(2): Sound("samples/drum_tom_mid_hard.wav"),
    Button(3): Sound("samples/drum_cymbal_open.wav"),
}

for button, sound in button_sounds.items():
    button.when_pressed = sound.play

pause()

See GPIO Music Box for a full resource.

All on when pressed

While the button is pressed down, the buzzer and all the lights come on.

FishDish:

from gpiozero import FishDish
from signal import pause

fish = FishDish()

fish.button.when_pressed = fish.on
fish.button.when_released = fish.off

pause()

Ryanteck TrafficHat:

from gpiozero import TrafficHat
from signal import pause

th = TrafficHat()

th.button.when_pressed = th.on
th.button.when_released = th.off

pause()

Using LED, Buzzer, and Button components:

from gpiozero import LED, Buzzer, Button
from signal import pause

button = Button(2)
buzzer = Buzzer(3)
red = LED(4)
amber = LED(5)
green = LED(6)

things = [red, amber, green, buzzer]

def things_on():
    for thing in things:
        thing.on()

def things_off():
    for thing in things:
        thing.off()

button.when_pressed = things_on
button.when_released = things_off

pause()

Full color LED

_images/rgb_led_bb.svg

Making colours with an RGBLED:

from gpiozero import RGBLED
from time import sleep

led = RGBLED(red=9, green=10, blue=11)

led.red = 1  # full red
sleep(1)
led.red = 0.5  # half red
sleep(1)

led.color = (0, 1, 0)  # full green
sleep(1)
led.color = (1, 0, 1)  # magenta
sleep(1)
led.color = (1, 1, 0)  # yellow
sleep(1)
led.color = (0, 1, 1)  # cyan
sleep(1)
led.color = (1, 1, 1)  # white
sleep(1)

led.color = (0, 0, 0)  # off
sleep(1)

# slowly increase intensity of blue
for n in range(100):
    led.blue = n/100
    sleep(0.1)

Motion sensor

_images/motion_sensor_bb.svg

Light an LED when a MotionSensor detects motion:

from gpiozero import MotionSensor, LED
from signal import pause

pir = MotionSensor(4)
led = LED(16)

pir.when_motion = led.on
pir.when_no_motion = led.off

pause()

Light sensor

_images/light_sensor_bb.svg

Have a LightSensor detect light and dark:

from gpiozero import LightSensor

sensor = LightSensor(18)

while True:
    sensor.wait_for_light()
    print("It's light! :)")
    sensor.wait_for_dark()
    print("It's dark :(")

Run a function when the light changes:

from gpiozero import LightSensor, LED
from signal import pause

sensor = LightSensor(18)
led = LED(16)

sensor.when_dark = led.on
sensor.when_light = led.off

pause()

Or make a PWMLED change brightness according to the detected light level:

from gpiozero import LightSensor, PWMLED
from signal import pause

sensor = LightSensor(18)
led = PWMLED(16)

led.source = sensor.values

pause()

Distance sensor

Have a DistanceSensor detect the distance to the nearest object:

from gpiozero import DistanceSensor
from time import sleep

sensor = DistanceSensor(23, 24)

while True:
    print('Distance to nearest object is', sensor.distance, 'm')
    sleep(1)

Run a function when something gets near the sensor:

from gpiozero import DistanceSensor, LED
from signal import pause

sensor = DistanceSensor(23, 24, max_distance=1, threshold_distance=0.2)
led = LED(16)

sensor.when_in_range = led.on
sensor.when_out_of_range = led.off

pause()

Motors

_images/motor_bb.svg

Spin a Motor around forwards and backwards:

from gpiozero import Motor
from time import sleep

motor = Motor(forward=4, backward=14)

while True:
    motor.forward()
    sleep(5)
    motor.backward()
    sleep(5)

Robot

Make a Robot drive around in (roughly) a square:

from gpiozero import Robot
from time import sleep

robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))

for i in range(4):
    robot.forward()
    sleep(10)
    robot.right()
    sleep(1)

Make a robot with a distance sensor that runs away when things get within 20cm of it:

from gpiozero import Robot, DistanceSensor
from signal import pause

sensor = DistanceSensor(23, 24, max_distance=1, threshold_distance=0.2)
robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))

sensor.when_in_range = robot.backward
sensor.when_out_of_range = robot.stop
pause()

Button controlled robot

Use four GPIO buttons as forward/back/left/right controls for a robot:

from gpiozero import Robot, Button
from signal import pause

robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))

left = Button(26)
right = Button(16)
fw = Button(21)
bw = Button(20)

fw.when_pressed = robot.forward
fw.when_released = robot.stop

left.when_pressed = robot.left
left.when_released = robot.stop

right.when_pressed = robot.right
right.when_released = robot.stop

bw.when_pressed = robot.backward
bw.when_released = robot.stop

pause()

Alternatively, use four buttons to program the directions and add a fifth button to process them in turn, like a Bee-Bot or Turtle robot.

from gpiozero import Button, Robot
from time import sleep
from signal import pause

robot = Robot((17, 18), (22, 23))

left = Button(2)
right = Button(3)
forward = Button(4)
backward = Button(5)
go = Button(6)

instructions = []

def add_instruction(btn):
    instructions.append({
        left:     (-1, 1),
        right:    (1, -1),
        forward:  (1, 1),
        backward: (-1, -1),
    }[btn])

def do_instructions():
    instructions.append((0, 0))
    robot.source_delay = 0.5
    robot.source = instructions
    sleep(robot.source_delay * len(instructions))
    del instructions[:]

go.when_pressed = do_instructions
for button in (left, right, forward, backward):
    button.when_pressed = add_instruction

pause()

Keyboard controlled robot

Use up/down/left/right keys to control a robot:

import curses
from gpiozero import Robot

robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))

actions = {
    curses.KEY_UP:    robot.forward,
    curses.KEY_DOWN:  robot.backward,
    curses.KEY_LEFT:  robot.left,
    curses.KEY_RIGHT: robot.right,
    }

def main(window):
    next_key = None
    while True:
        curses.halfdelay(1)
        if next_key is None:
            key = window.getch()
        else:
            key = next_key
            next_key = None
        if key != -1:
            # KEY DOWN
            curses.halfdelay(3)
            action = actions.get(key)
            if action is not None:
                action()
            next_key = key
            while next_key == key:
                next_key = window.getch()
            # KEY UP
            robot.stop()

curses.wrapper(main)

Note

This recipe uses the standard curses module. This module requires that Python is running in a terminal in order to work correctly, hence this recipe will not work in environments like IDLE.

If you prefer a version that works under IDLE, the following recipe should suffice:

from gpiozero import Robot
from evdev import InputDevice, list_devices, ecodes

robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))

# Get the list of available input devices
devices = [InputDevice(device) for device in list_devices()]
# Filter out everything that's not a keyboard. Keyboards are defined as any
# device which has keys, and which specifically has keys 1..31 (roughly Esc,
# the numeric keys, the first row of QWERTY plus a few more) and which does
# *not* have key 0 (reserved)
must_have = {i for i in range(1, 32)}
must_not_have = {0}
devices = [
    dev
    for dev in devices
    for keys in (set(dev.capabilities().get(ecodes.EV_KEY, [])),)
    if must_have.issubset(keys)
    and must_not_have.isdisjoint(keys)
]
# Pick the first keyboard
keyboard = devices[0]

keypress_actions = {
    ecodes.KEY_UP: robot.forward,
    ecodes.KEY_DOWN: robot.backward,
    ecodes.KEY_LEFT: robot.left,
    ecodes.KEY_RIGHT: robot.right,
}

for event in keyboard.read_loop():
    if event.type == ecodes.EV_KEY and event.code in keypress_actions:
        if event.value == 1:  # key down
            keypress_actions[event.code]()
        if event.value == 0:  # key up
            robot.stop()

Note

This recipe uses the third-party evdev module. Install this library with sudo pip3 install evdev first. Be aware that evdev will only work with local input devices; this recipe will not work over SSH.

Motion sensor robot

Make a robot drive forward when it detects motion:

from gpiozero import Robot, MotionSensor
from signal import pause

robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))
pir = MotionSensor(5)

pir.when_motion = robot.forward
pir.when_no_motion = robot.stop

pause()

Alternatively:

from gpiozero import Robot, MotionSensor
from signal import pause

robot = Robot(left=(4, 14), right=(17, 18))
pir = MotionSensor(5)

robot.source = zip(pir.values, pir.values)

pause()

Potentiometer

_images/potentiometer_bb.svg

Continually print the value of a potentiometer (values between 0 and 1) connected to a MCP3008 analog to digital converter:

from gpiozero import MCP3008

pot = MCP3008(channel=0)

while True:
    print(pot.value)

Present the value of a potentiometer on an LED bar graph using PWM to represent states that won’t “fill” an LED:

from gpiozero import LEDBarGraph, MCP3008
from signal import pause

graph = LEDBarGraph(5, 6, 13, 19, 26, pwm=True)
pot = MCP3008(channel=0)
graph.source = pot.values
pause()

Measure temperature with an ADC

Wire a TMP36 temperature sensor to the first channel of an MCP3008 analog to digital converter:

from gpiozero import MCP3008
from time import sleep

def convert_temp(gen):
    for value in gen:
        yield (value * 3.3 - 0.5) * 100

adc = MCP3008(channel=0)

for temp in convert_temp(adc.values):
    print('The temperature is', temp, 'C')
    sleep(1)

Full color LED controlled by 3 potentiometers

Wire up three potentiometers (for red, green and blue) and use each of their values to make up the colour of the LED:

from gpiozero import RGBLED, MCP3008

led = RGBLED(red=2, green=3, blue=4)
red_pot = MCP3008(channel=0)
green_pot = MCP3008(channel=1)
blue_pot = MCP3008(channel=2)

while True:
    led.red = red_pot.value
    led.green = green_pot.value
    led.blue = blue_pot.value

Alternatively, the following example is identical, but uses the source property rather than a while loop:

from gpiozero import RGBLED, MCP3008
from signal import pause

led = RGBLED(2, 3, 4)
red_pot = MCP3008(0)
green_pot = MCP3008(1)
blue_pot = MCP3008(2)

led.source = zip(red_pot.values, green_pot.values, blue_pot.values)

pause()

Please note the example above requires Python 3. In Python 2, zip() doesn’t support lazy evaluation so the script will simply hang.

Controlling the Pi’s own LEDs

On certain models of Pi (specifically the model A+, B+, and 2B) it’s possible to control the power and activity LEDs. This can be useful for testing GPIO functionality without the need to wire up your own LEDs (also useful because the power and activity LEDs are “known good”).

Firstly you need to disable the usual triggers for the built-in LEDs. This can be done from the terminal with the following commands:

$ echo none | sudo tee /sys/class/leds/led0/trigger
$ echo gpio | sudo tee /sys/class/leds/led1/trigger

Now you can control the LEDs with gpiozero like so:

from gpiozero import LED
from signal import pause

power = LED(35) # /sys/class/leds/led1
activity = LED(47) # /sys/class/leds/led0

activity.blink()
power.blink()
pause()

To revert the LEDs to their usual purpose you can either reboot your Pi or run the following commands:

$ echo mmc0 | sudo tee /sys/class/leds/led0/trigger
$ echo input | sudo tee /sys/class/leds/led1/trigger

Note

On the Pi Zero you can control the activity LED with this recipe, but there’s no separate power LED to control (it’s also worth noting the activity LED is active low, so set active_high=False when constructing your LED component).

On the original Pi 1 (model A or B), the activity LED can be controlled with GPIO16 (after disabling its trigger as above) but the power LED is hard-wired on.

On the Pi 3B the LEDs are controlled by a GPIO expander which is not accessible from gpiozero (yet).